HOW TO HAVE AN EPIC ONE WEEK IN JORDAN ITINERARY

How to spend 7 days in Jordan. An Itinerary

PLAN A PERFECT JORDAN ITINERARY FOR 7 DAYS

Are you planning your Jordan itinerary and wondering how to spend one week in Jordan? Then read on – I happily share my tips on what places to visit in 7 days in Jordan along with many more travel tips for an epic Jordan itinerary.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links which means I might earn a small commission when you buy a product (at no extra cost to you) after clicking on my link. More about it here.

Jordan is surely an amazing and stunning country! However, you might need to do some preparation before visiting, so your Jordan trip does not turn out disappointing. Here are tips on how to spend 7 days in Jordan (and up to 10 days) and many travel tips for your Jordan itinerary – including tips on where to stay, how to get around, and more.

TRAVEL TIPS FOR ONE WEEK IN JORDAN

Before talking about the best places to visit in Jordan in one week, here are some essential travel tips, so you know what to expect.

One Week in Jordan – Best Time to Visit

Weather-wise, spring or fall are the best times to visit Jordan.

  • March until May is the busiest time in Jordan. Visitors from all around the world flock to Jordan to experience an amazing time. The weather is quite moderate and warm (it can get quite hot in the summer months and chilly in the winter). Prices for accommodation normally increase during this time, though.
  • I visited in mid-October, which is also a good time. The weather was pleasant most of the time (despite a heatwave at the Dead Sea), and there was little rain. All activities I planned were still available. Also, prices for accommodation were not at a peak.
  • However, if you prefer a less busy month, then November (or even December) could be a good time to visit, too or February.

How to Arrive in Jordan

Most likely, you will arrive in Amman. From Amman Airport, you have several options.

  • You can take an airport taxi. Prices are fixed (about $30 to downtown Amman), and you get a receipt/voucher outside the terminal to take to the taxi.
  • There is also a bus running once or twice an hour that costs about $4 (buy tickets at the ticket office outside the terminal). You can get off the North Station and then either take a cab or an Uber (I had free wifi at the station and got my Uber, but many taxis are waiting). From there, it is about $2-3 to get to your hotel in/near downtown.
  • Uber works in Amman, but apparently, they are not allowed to pick you up from the airport. You have free wifi in the airport and can try ordering an Uber, but rides will normally be canceled.
  • You can also pick up your rental car from the airport. There are several companies, and getting from the airport to the other parts of Jordan is quite easy.

Getting Around Jordan For One Week

  • In Amman and Jerash, you can easily get around by buses, shared or regular taxis, Uber, or guided tours/personal drivers.
  • Rental cars could be another option – but maybe only outside of Amman.
  • Personally, I am happy I did not get a rental car for my time in Amman as it can be busy. Driving in an Arabic capital can often feel crazy – and so it does in Amman. 
  • However, outside of Amman, driving was quite easy. Even if not all the streets are in top condition, it was fun to drive because there were not many cars. Window views were often great as the scenery is frequently stunning. 

Just be aware of the speed bumps, and you’ll be fine. I have a more detailed post about road tripping in Jordan, which you can check out here.

What to Pack For One Week in Jordan

  • Jordan is a great country to visit if you are an active traveler/tourist. So, pack your trainers and sweatpants. But also take your swimsuits, because there are times you might be in the water.
  • One of the things you will probably end up buying is a typical scarf that you can use as a head cover – to protect yourself from the heat, but also from sand, or if you want to visit a mosque.
  • Jordan is an Islamic country, after all – so dress moderately. There is no need for scarves or long sleeves, but you might not want to pack the shortest shorts you own or the smallest crop-top.

7 Day in Jordan as a Solo Female Traveler

I visited Jordan by myself and felt totally fine. I tend to be careful in general, and I never felt that I needed to be extra cautious or more careful.

Jordanians are friendly, and compared to other Arabs, it felt like they were more humble and quieter. However, you will not see many women outside of Amman. Actually, I hardly saw any local women outside the town centers or big hotel chains. Petra, Treasury_Regardless, I still felt safe and never worried about my safety. Just ignore the taxi drivers that can be pushy at times. For more general solo travel tips, click here but make sure to check out my solo travel guide for Jordan, too.

Jordan Pass for Your 7 Days

You most likely will have to pay for your visa. As a visitor from the EU (Germany), the visa cost is about $56. If you stay for at least 3 nights in Jordan, you can buy the Jordan Pass (online or on arrival). The price for a Jordan Pass is around $100-113.

With the Jordan Pass, you will get entry to over 40 attractions in Jordan – including Petra, Jerash, and more. However, you must decide whether you want a 1, 2, or 3-day Pass for Petra and can’t change that later.

I only had to pay extra entry fees at Wadi Mujib and Petra by Night- everything else was covered with the Jordan Pass. Since Petra is quite expensive, a Jordan Pass almost always makes sense. Check out prices here.

Here are more Jordan travel tips.

BEST PLACES TO VISIT IN JORDAN IN ONE WEEK

Let´s get started with places to visit in one week in Jordan.

Amman (1 Day)

You most likely will fly into Jordan, and I suggest spending at least one full day in Amman – whether as the first or last stop of your trip. Jordan´s capital is a fun and busy place and should not be missed on your Jordan itinerary. Half of Jordan’s population lives in the Amman area, making it a busy and hectic place. Amman citadel is one of the best places to see in JordanIt is also one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Downtown Amman, in particular, has quite a few ancient attractions. But you’ll also find modern buildings, and it is an interesting city full of contrasts. Amman is busy and crazy as so many busy Arabian cities are – chaotic, but still lovely with many sights along the way.

THINGS TO DO IN AMMAN

  • Check out the shops that sell all kinds of products and all kinds of restaurants.
  • Amman is also known for its good nightlife, though I have not experienced it firsthand.
  • A few must-see places in Amman include the Roman Amphitheatre and the souks in downtown Amman.
  • Situated in a hilly area, the Citadel offers great views and makes walking a bit of a workout. Watch the sunset from Citadel Hill.
  • End your day in one of the numerous cafes and restaurants on Rainbow Street
  • Amman also boasts museums, and you do not have to pay an entry fee if you have a Jordan Pass.

WHERE TO STAY IN AMMAN

Amman offers accommodation for all kinds of travelers – you will find everything from luxury hotels to hostels and Airbnb.

  • I stayed in Nomads Hostel Hotel. It was very conveniently located near Rainbow Street and made it easy for me to connect with other female travelers. The hostel is fun, modern, and clean, with a great location. Check it out here.
  • For a mid-range hotel option, I suggest Albasem Hotel, which is well-rated and centrally located. Check out rates and availabilities here.
  • For a luxury hotel, try The House Boutique Suites, which is also near Rainbow Street and offers lots of amenities.  Find out more about the hotel here.

From Amman to Jerash, your next destination, it takes about 1 hour (30miles/50km).

Jerash (0,5 Day)

Jerash, located north of Amman, is an ancient city – dating back more than 6,500 years – and it had its golden age during Roman rule. And Jerash is impressive. After all, it is one of the best-preserved Roman provincial towns and also one of the biggest. It was only rediscovered “recently” and has been restored over the last 70 years. It has become the main Roman site in the country with attractions like the Hadrian´s Arch (Triumphal Arch), the hippodrome, the South Gate, the forum, and the Temple of Zeus, just to name a few.

I did not visit Jerash with a guide, and in hindsight, I regret it. Some more background information – given during a tour – would have been nice in retrospect – to learn more about the places and also understand ancient life better and appreciate Jerash even more.

HOW TO GET TO JERASH WITHOUT A CAR

I went to Jerash and then back to Amman and then picked up my rental car the next day. However, if you leave Amman and do not plan to get back, I suggest picking up your rental car and drive to Jerash yourself. In case you have other plans, you can also get there without your own car.

  • I took a minibus to get to Jerash (direct connection from the North Station) – a ticket is less around $1.50 one-way.
  • You can also easily get there by taxi (look out for a shared taxi to save money) and it is a lovely and scenic drive. 

For the whole trip, ideally plan in half a day or a full day.

From Jerash to the Dead Sea, your next destination, it takes about 90 minutes (60miles/95km).

Dead Sea (1 Day)

With 7 days in Jordan, you should visit the Dead Sea, where you’ll be at the lowest point on Earth – more than 400 meters below sea level.

You cannot really swim in the Dead Sea. It would be like floating in extremely salty water that makes every pore of your body itch. Mud at the Dead Sea, JordanApparently, even Cleopatra came here to enjoy her beauty sessions. So, we should do as Cleopatra did (at least in this case) and enjoy the “largest natural spa in the world.“

Yes, the water contains a lot of salt, magnesium, sodium, and oozier chlorides, which you might not enjoy much at first. And yes, it is true: putting mud – with all the minerals – from the Dead Sea all over your body will give you extremely soft skin.

So, the results are worth it.Dead Sea, Mövenpick pool with a view

TIPS FOR DEAD SEA

  • Do not shave shortly before your trip to the Dead Sea. The minerals in the water will cause some pain – if you have or have open wounds, it will be even worse.
  • Even with only 7 days, you should stop by at the Dead Sea for at least a short time. Most beach sections belong to luxury resorts. There is a beach section open to the public.
  • Since accommodations here are quite pricey, spending a few hours at the Dead Sea is fine, too.

WHERE TO STAY AT DEAD SEA

The region is home to several luxury hotels.

  • I stayed a the 5* Mövenpick hotel with its own beach area and a pool with a view. Though it was not as luxurious as some other 5-star hotels, I enjoyed my stay and would book it again. Check out rates here.

From the Dead Sea to Wadi Mujib, your next destination, it takes about 30 minutes (18miles/25km). While Wadi Mujib is at the Dead Sea, this estimation is based on the premise you are staying at/near Mövenpick Hotel.

Wadi Mujib (0,5 Day)

Leave the Dead Sea after your breakfast and head to Wadi Mujib. This place is often overlooked though it is so much fun. Wadi Mujib was actually one of the highlights of my 7-day Jordan trip. I am not overly sporty or adventurous, but that 3-hour trip was so much fun. Wadi Mujib in Jordan is one of the fun places to go in JordanThe Mujib Biosphere Reserve is the lowest nature reserve in the world. The Wadi Mujib Gorge, which enters the Dead Sea at 410 meters below sea level, is a stunning place that took my breath away. With the help of my guide, I waddled like a penguin through the gorge, climbed stairs under waterfalls, floated in between the gorge, and just had an amazing time overall.

TIPS FOR WADI MUJIB GORGE

  • The starting point of all the adventures and activities (except the Al Hidan trail) is at Mujib Adventure Center. There are parking slots for free and toilets.
  • You need to pay for tickets, which are around $27 (only cash accepted), and I was not sure whether I could get through the gorge without any guidance, so I booked a guide for a total of $50 (including entry fees), and it was worth it.
  • There are several trails you can choose from. I chose the shortest (but as my guide emphasized, it does not translate to be the easiest). It took several hours in total (with getting changed, organizing my tour, etc., it probably took a bit more than 3 hours).
  • Wear shorts (or a swimsuit), a life vest is a must, and you can rent special “water shoes” there for a few dollars. Don’t wear sunglasses (you are in the shade the whole time), and if you take a GoPro, etc., be careful, as my guide found 2 sunglasses and 1 GoPro in the water in the 2,5 hours we were together. You can also rent a waterproof bag if needed.
  • Unfortunately, Wadi Mujib is closed in the winter. The exact date is not fixed, but normally, the winter season is from mid/end of October, so double-check their opening hours and email them if you visit in the winter months.

If you are under the big waterfall, take your time and sit down. There are many little fish that are also used in the fish spa. I am terribly scared of fish but overcame my fear and let them eat my dead skin, and I must say- my feet still feel great (weeks after that “pedicure”).FIsh spa at Wadi Mujib

From Wadi Mujib to Dana Natur Reserve, your next destination, it takes about 2 hours (72miles/116km).

Dana Nature Reserve (1 Day)

Dana is a lesser-known destination in Jordan but a stunning place that you should add to your Jordan itinerary. 

Dana is a top tourist spot, especially for hikers (and sunset lovers) and people looking for off-the-beaten-path places in Jordan – a very tranquil place. Dana Nature Reserve at sunsetDana is the largest nature reserve and located between the Dead Sea and Petra, making it a perfect stop when going from one main site to the other.

It covers more than 300 square km in and around Dana village and Wadi Dana. The native inhabitants, the Al Atata tribe, has been living there for more than 6000 years. Nowadays, there are also a few guesthouses that host visitors from all around the world.

I spontaneously booked my accommodations and planned to go on a short hike the next day. I am not going to lie – I did not do well with the hike. It was hot, and I was exhausted from my Wadi Mujib trip the day before. However, it is a beautiful place to hike.

TIPS FOR DANA

  • I recommend staying here overnight and enjoying one of the many hiking trails.
  • Normally, the guesthouses offer guided hiking tours (guided tours surely make sense here), and you can book them on the spot once you arrive.

WHERE TO STAY IN DANA

As far as I can judge, the accommodations here are very basic. Dana is not about luxury but more about authentic Jordanian life.

  • I stayed at Al Nawatef Camp and enjoyed my stay at the camp. However, I wished I had brought a sleeping bag, as in Bedouin camps, sheets are not used (you get a wool blanket without any sheet). The dinner was great and the view amazing. I recommend getting to the camp before the sun sets, as, on a clear day, sunsets here are amazing! Check out prices here.

From the Dana to Petra, your next destination, it takes about 60 minutes (34miles/55km).

Petra (1-2 Days)

Petra, also known as the rose-red city, is THE main tourist attraction in Jordan.Treasury view from above

Though it is not known when exactly the city was built, it began to prosper as the capital of the Nabataean Empire after the 1st century BC. It was later annexed by the Roman Empire and flourished until it was destroyed largely by an earthquake in the 4th century AD.  

Bedouins inhabited it after that, but in the 19th century, it was “rediscovered“ by a Swiss explorer and has since become a more famous ancient city. With the Indiana Jones movie, Petra has gained popularity, so now it is often crowded – but believe me, it is still worth it.

When you get a Jordan Pass, you need to decide how many days you want to spend in Petra and buy the exact Jordan Pass you need (if you do not want to pay extra if you want to stay longer). I bought a 3-day pass for Petra, but with only 7 days in Jordan, 2 days in Petra is probably a good amount to spend there. There are several hiking trails, and I could not do the main one in one day. If you are super fit, you can probably do three or so, but I suggest doing two hikes a day.

TIPS FOR PETRA

  • Some of the top things to see in Petra: The Siq, the Theater, the Treasury (Al Khazna), the Monastery (Ad Deir), the Colonnaded Street, and the Royal Tombs.
  • PLEASE, do NOT USE any donkeys when you get around in Petra. The Bedouins were very friendly, but animals used for visitors are maltreated. Please use your feet to get around – even though Petra is big and you are tempted to be carried around. I saw some electric carriages – if you are not fit, rather use them.

WHERE TO STAY IN PETRA

I stayed in Petra for three nights in total and stayed in 2 different properties.

  • First, I stayed two nights in Wadi Musa – about 15 minutes walk from Petra and it was a basic place to stay (with a curfew at midnight which I was not aware of when I booked the hotel). However, it is a decent place to stay if you are on a budget. Check out Hotel Cleopatra.
  • Then I stayed at a luxury property a bit further from Petra (15 minutes drive). The place is registered as a 3star hotel at Booking but it is definitely a much, much better place and actually, I liked it better than the 5-star Mövenpick hotel. It is a perfect place to stay if you do not want to stay in Petra directly and escape the tourist crowds. Check out this unique and pretty place near Petra.

Petra By Night (3 Hours)

Three times a week, Petra By Night takes place (Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays). The Siq gets illuminated by candles, and in front of the Treasury, you’ll hear the sound of a Bedouin shepherd´s flute.

I read mixed reviews, but as a blogger, I felt I needed to see it with my own eyes to make a real judgment and tell you about it. I planned my whole Jordan trip around Petra by Night – but it was a disappointment. 

  • I wasted around $24 (this ticket is not included in the Jordan Pass).
  • It was crowded.
  • People were loud in the Siq (which totally killed the mood – seriously guys, sometimes you need to shut up!)
  • And it ended by 9:15 pm already, and people yelled, “Finish, finish.“ 

This was the biggest and only disappointment in Jordan. But of course, it is up to you if you want to experience it yourself. 

You can book your tickets at the Petra Visitor Centre, and it starts at 8:30 pm.

Little Petra (Few Hours)

Little Petra – known as Siq al Barid – is another place to add to your one-week in Jordan itinerary. It is located close to Petra and is also a Nabataean site, with sites built around the same time Petra was built.

Apparently, it is less busy, and hikes are less demanding, but it is worth visiting. I did not visit in the daytime – and I regret it. I visited by night, and it was magical. I did not visit the town center, but some bedouin campsites are so lovely to visit once it gets dark.

You can have tea at one of the places or even book accommodation – the caves were illuminated, and it looked stunning. It is a great place to visit at night – definitely more magical than Petra by night. To check out the Seven Bedouin Camp by night, click here (and my tip: stay there a night, too).

From Petra to Wadi Rum, your next destination, it takes about 90 minutes (65miles/105km).

Wadi Rum (1-2 Days)

Wadi Rum is another fantastic highlight in Jordan. Wadi Rum is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site – in the natural and cultural significance categories.

As with Petra, Wadi Rum was inhabited by the Nabataeans in prehistoric times – and now it is one of the best places to visit in Jordan in one week. Lawrence of Arabia was filmed here, and some other famous movies – and the scenery is unique. Do a desert safari, enjoy the sunset, and admire the interesting landscape you have here.

TIPS FOR VISITING WADI RUM

  • You need to sign up at the Visitor´s Center – if you have a Jordan Pass, you will not need to pay the entry fee. 
  • I recommend arriving there around 4 or 5 pm, so you can still watch the sunset, enjoy dinner at the camp, and book your tour for the next day. I seriously recommend doing a full-day trip, not just a trip for 4-5 hours.  Then you have the chance to see more of the vast desert before enjoying another sunset and having your dinner.
  • Leave early the next day after breakfast and head back towards Amman.

WHERE TO STAY IN WADI RUM

I recommend staying directly in Wadi Rum and not outside of it. If your accommodation is in Wadi Rum directly (and not in Wadi Rum Village), you most likely will be picked up from the village and then driven to your camp. Your car will most likely stay in the Wadi Rum village, but safety is normally not a big issue. 

  • I recommend booking a tent at Bedouin night & tours, but apparently, it closed after my visit (I had a great time, though!). However, most bedouin camps have great reviews. Check out different camps here.

From the Dana to Petra, your next destination, it takes about 4 hours (200miles/310km).

What if you have more than one week in Jordan? If that is the case, I have an extra tip for you.

Aqaba (1-2 Days)

In the south of Jordan, you will find the only coastal city – Aqaba. If you are into diving and snorkeling, then Aqaba might be a good place to spend a day or two. I am not a fan of being underwater, so it was easy for me to skip it. However, with only 7 days in Jordan, you would need to skip one of the other places mentioned above or do everything faster so you can enjoy some diving in Aqaba, too.

FINAL THOUGHTS ON CREATING A FUN 7-DAY JORDAN TRIP

Jordan has become one of my most favorite travel destinations of all time. It is such a magical place, and even though places like Petra or the Dead Sea have become quite popular, it did not feel like Jordan is overrun by visitors.

Driving in Jordan felt amazing – with all the empty streets – and the sights and people made the trip perfect. So, whenever you plan your one week in Jordan, I hope you will have as much fun as I had, and this itinerary helps you plan your trip!

Stay safe.

PIN ME FOR LATER – ONE WEEK IN JORDAN ITINERARY

best places to visit in 7 days in Jordan, itinerary_

Safe Travels, Arzo

Epic Things to do in Jordan

best things to do in Jordan

WHAT TO DO IN JORDAN – BEST ACTIVITIES FOR ALL BUDGETS

You might have heard about Jordan´s beauty and what an amazing country it is to visit?! Rightfully, Jordan has become more and popular these days, and I am pretty sure Jordan will not disappoint you. However, you might be wondering about the best things to do in Jordan and its main attractions. If so, read on and find out what to do and see.

Yes, Jordan is a quite small country, but there are still many things to do. To be honest, I would need to visit Jordan, again and again, to find out about all the good things to do. And while I do not even claim to have experienced all the fun things, I compiled a list of my favorite Jordan activities as well as more great things to see and do in Jordan.

Visit Petra

Petra is probably the most famous place in Jordan, and you cannot visit Jordan without visiting Petra. Whether you see the monastery or the treasury, or any of the other ancient buildings and sights that were created more than 2,000 years ago, you have to explore this city. It was actually very prosperous back at that time, but it eventually died out.

However, it was rediscovered “recently“ and has become the main tourist attraction. It was also used as a filming location for Indiana Jones if you needed more reasons to visit this UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

Make sure to plan in enough time to see the “Rose City“ as it is home to many sights and people underestimate its size. 

Petra is rather big, and it involves a lot of hiking, so plan in at least one and a half days so that you can do a few different kinds of hikes and see sights like the Treasury, the Monastery or the Tombs (just to name a few).

Price for Petra: The entrance fee for Petra is quite high. You can check the prices out here. If you have a Jordan Pass (highly recommended), you have the fees included.

READ MORE: Solo female travel tips for Jordan

Enjoy Petra by Night

Petra by Night is a big event that takes place three times a week. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, the Siq gets illuminated by candles, and in front of the Treasury, you’ll hear the sound of a Bedouin shepherd´s flute. For some, it is a must-do in Jordan and a highlight – for me, it was a disappointment. I expected something magical, and people were just loud. Along the Siq, people talked loudly, ran around, and ruined the moment for those looking for something magical. It probably would have been amazing if people could have shut up for some minutes so.

However, I have an alternative that you can do and see Petra by night – without extra costs and with the crowds.

Go to Little Petra, just a few kilometers near Petra, and have tea at one of the Bedouin camps. It is extremely beautiful and romantic and a better experience than the official Petra by Night. Many candles light the caves (they are electric, but you can’t tell from afar), and this is what a romantic and “authentic“ place looks like.

Explore Jerash

Jerash dates back several thousand years and is the best-preserved and largest Roman site outside of Italy and without a doubt, visiting Jerash is one of the best things to do in Jordan. It actually impressed me more than any of the Italian Roman sites. The place is so huge and one of the main attractions in Jordan. It has become the main Roman site in Jordan with attractions like the Hadrian´s Arch (Triumphal Arch), the hippodrome, the South Gate, and more.

From Amman, it is a half-day trip – you can drive there yourself or get there by taxi/Uber or even a public bus (leaving from North Station for around 1,10€). There is no entrance fee if you have a Jordan Pass.

Cycle Through Jordan

This is for you guys (not so for me) – cycling in Jordan seems like an amazing idea for the really active ones amongst you.

Of course, you could bike anywhere, but Jordan does have a specific Bike Trail. It is a 730-kilometer trail from the south to the north – passing the main attractions like Petra, the Dead Sea, and Aqaba. Surely, this is not for everyone, and you have to be a fit and experienced cyclist, but even for someone like me – who just cycles a few kilometers – this sounds absolutely amazing and intriguing.

So, surely exploring Jordan by bike surely is something to consider if you are into being active.

Float in the Dead Sea

Floating in the Dead Sea is a bucket list experience, and in Jordan, you can treat yourself to some time at the Dead Sea (which also makes the lowest point of Earth).Mud at the Dead Sea, Jordan This body of water is partly located in Jordan. Don’t expect to swim or float here for hours, though. Normally, most people are only in it for a few minutes. 

It is known for its healing effects and is good for your skin because the water is so rich in salt and other minerals that it is said that even Cleopatra used to have her beauty spa sessions here. But be aware that you will feel every hole and pore in your skin while in the water.

Also, make sure to wrap yourself from head to toe with the mud here and try to find some salt to mix with it. Leave it on for 15-20 minutes before you wash it away – it will have an amazing effect on your skin, and while it will not last days, my skin has hardly felt better.

So, taking a mud bath and floating in the Dead Sea is another must-do in Jordan. 

Wadi Rum Desert Safari

Wadi Rum is a desert valley in the south of Jordan, and visiting should be on any Jordan itinerary. It is also well-known because Lawrence of Arabia was filmed here, and this is where he actually began his journey through the desert. 

But there is more to it than being a “pretty“ filling location – this UNESCO World Heritage Site was also inhabited by the Nabataeans in prehistoric times (like Petra), and now, it is a place where Bedouins live, and tourists visit for half a day, a full day or even longer. 

You will see beautiful rock formations in this part of Jordan. You can do some really fun desert tours, and they are well worth both the money and the time.

Spend a Few Hours at Wadi Mujib

My favorite sporty, adventurous activity in Jordan was canoeing in Wadi Mujib. The Mujib Biosphere Reserve is the lowest nature reserve in the world. This is a gorge with water in the base which makes a fun activity to walk through (or biplane through, float, etc.).Wadi Mujib in Jordan is one of the fun places to go in JordanYou will have to pay an entrance fee to get in here, and I booked a personal guide who helped me with the canoeing, sliding, climbing, and paddling but you can also do unguided tours. I did the shortest route, which took about 2 hours (3 hours in total with getting changed etc, and I paid around 30€ – cash only), but it was fun, and you can do even longer hikes if you want to.

Unfortunately, you cannot do these activities year-round as it closed in the winter, so make sure you check the opening times.

Stay in a Bedouin camp

I stayed at several Bedouin camps during my time in Jordan, and staying there was unique and amazing.Dana Nature Reserve at sunset Friendly hosts, stunning scenery (depending on where you stay), good food – these are some of the perks when staying in a bedouin camp in Jordan.

Also, most bedouin camps are affordable, but they are also very basic and not the most luxurious. However, it proves once more that there is no need for a luxury hotel to experience happiness. It’s an amazing experience, so don’t miss out on it during your Jordan visit.

Hike at Dana Nature Reserve

Hiking is another great thing to do in Jordan. Probably not in the summer months but when the weather allows it. The Dana Nature Reserve is one of Jordan’s most popular hiking spots. There are several different trails that you can do – from a couple of hours to several days.

To be honest, I had a love-hate relationship with my hiking in Jordan (and I just did a 3-hour hike) – but in the end, it was a fun activity, and others I met along the way LOVED hiking there.

Enjoy Views From Mount Nebo

Mount Nebo is another very interesting thing to do and is especially interesting from a religious point of view. Apparently, Moses climbed up to the top of the mountain and saw the Promised Land before he died. You have great views from here. It is close to Amman and the Dead Sea, so you could easily visit it while staying in Amman.

Visit Amman

Some people skip Amman, but you seriously cannot miss out on Amman. Half of Jordan’s population lives in the Amman area, so it is quite busy and chaotic. But still charming and fun. Amman citadel is one of the best places to see in JordanYou have to visit the capital of Jordan and stay for at least a day so that you can check out the downtown area with the ancient sights like the Amphitheater.  You can hike up to the Citadel – another ancient sight – and enjoy the best city views from there.  Check out my Amman itinerary for more tips.

Watch the Sunset

Jordan has some amazing spots to see the sunset. One of the places to enjoy beautiful sunsets is sown in the Dana Nature Reserve, the Dead Sea, or in Wadi Rum.Dead Sea, Mövenpick pool with a view You can also see great ones from the Citadel in Amman. Either way, make sure not to spend your time indoors when the sun sets but to enjoy this free activity in Jordan.

Dive in Aqaba

Jordan has only one coastal city – Aqaba, and this is a popular diving and snorkeling location off the Red Sea.  Personally, I don’t dive or snorkel as I’m not very interested in these things, but for many, diving in Aqaba is one of the fun stuff to do.

For all those who love to be underwater, Aqaba is the place to be. Or for those who want to relax at the beach after so much traveling in Jordan (as fun as it is, it can be really exhausting).

Road-Trip Jordan

The best way to get around Jordan is road-tripping. I am trying to be as environmentally friendly as possible, but I do make exceptions with flying and driving (sometimes), but Jordan is a country where road-tripping makes the most sense as getting around with – solely- public transportation is not the easiest thing. But driving in Jordan is an experience in itself. I tend to be chicken about driving in some (especially Arabic) countries, but it was actually quite easy and doable in Jordan.

The streets are okay (some are actually pretty good), and there are not many cars on the street, which makes driving in Jordan quite stress-free. I have a detailed post about a Jordan road trip – but in a sentence: Road tripping in Jordan was just amazing!

Enjoy the Food

Last but not least, eat a lot in Jordan because the food is great there. I am aware that I do not often recommend “eating” as an activity, but one of the very best things to do in Jordan is to eat. Eat a lot.Falafel sandwich in Amman Especially the falafel (chickpea balls fried in oil), which are really amazing most everywhere in Jordan, should be part of your diet here.  They also have some meat dishes, but you will not find many places where the vegetarian food is as delicious as it is in Jordan. 

Eat your weight in falafel with delicious bread, veggies, and hummus. And the best: You don’t have to stay in expensive hotels to have that great food – actually, smaller B&B or restaurants often have better and more authentic food so you can have all that great food for little money!

For more Jordan travel tips, click here.

Jordan is such a diverse and interesting place to visit, and these are some of the best things to do in Jordan. Make sure you plan some (or all) of these into your own Jordan itinerary to have the best trip possible. Since prices are lower than in many western European cities (or the US), most activities mentioned here are actually quite affordable – or even free – and they do not cost a fortune, making it even more fun!

PIN ME FOR LATER – THINGS TO DO AND SEE IN JORDAN

Save this pin on Pinterest for your Jordan trip!

Epic things to do in Jordan, Middle East travel, Arzo TravelsSafe Travels, Arzo

Best Jordan Travel Tips

best travel tips for Jordan

BEST TRAVEL TIPS FOR JORDAN – WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE VISITING JORDAN

If you are planning – or even only considering – a trip to Jordan, you might be wondering about many things. Is it safe, where to go, what to see, how to get around, and more. So if this is the case, I have compiled a list with the best Jordan travel tips.

Jordan has become an extremely popular travel destination, and I can totally understand why. It is one of the best places to visit at the moment.

The people are amazing, the sights and attractions are stunning, the food is great, it feels safe, and there are many other great things about Jordan. So, here are my favorite travel tips for Jordan.

Jordan Visa

You will most likely need a visa, and you will most likely need to pay for it. Even as a German/European as the visa is not free. Many nationalities can get it upon arrival, and it is quite easy for most nationalities.

Single Entry visas valid for one month: 40 JOD (around $56).

Jordan Pass

One of the best Jordan travel tips I can give you is to get a Jordan Pass. If you go to Jordan, you will likely have to pay for a visa. It is $56 for a tourist visa upon arrival. However, I truly recommend getting a Jordan Pass if you are staying more than 4 days. You can buy it in person or online.

The cheapest version is around $100, and with it, you also gain entrance to Petra (which is quite expensive and is $70 for a day pass), entrance to Jerash, access to attractions in Amman, and entrance into many more museums.

It is worth it to buy the pass in advance. The only downside is that you have to think about how many days you want to stay in Petra because the price depends on whether you need a 1, 2, or 3-day pass to Petra.

Best Time to Visit Jordan

Another important Jordan travel tip is about the time of your visit. There are a few months that you should not visit Jordan unless you love the heat. Typically, from March to May is very popular and the busy season. At this time, it is pleasantly warm and a little hottish but bearable.

October and November are also pleasant. The summer months, though, are too hot. And winter months, like December and January, are too cold.Wadi Mujib is a must in Jordan in 7 days Some places, like Wadi Mujib, are closed during the winter. This is the shoulder season, and it is better than visiting in the summer. 

Getting Around Jordan

Jordan is quite small, but I don’t recommend staying in Amman and just doing day trips to have the best experience.

You need to move somehow, though. You could get around by buses and public transportation – which works, but they don’t run very frequently and are sometimes inflexible.

While I love public transportation in general, my tip is to use guided tours or taxis (discuss prices beforehand), use Uber (not available everywhere, but they are at the main attractions), or rent a car.  Check out my Jordan road trip itinerary with many tips on driving in Jordan.

Driving in Jordan

Jordan is probably one of the few Middle Eastern countries where I dare to drive.Jordan Road Trip There are not many cars here, so it is easy to drive. The roads are in good condition for the most part – and the views are, often, great. Petrol is cheap – you pay less than $1 per liter for Gasoline 90.

GPS sometimes tricked me because there are many construction and new streets; however, I found it quite easy to drive outside of Amman.

Also, beware of the many speed bumps here.

How Long to Stay in Jordan

I advise staying 7-14 days. With less than 7 days, e.g., 5 days, you would still be able to see many beautiful places but 7 days is actually the minimum I recommend.

Security in Jordan

The Middle East is an explosive region, but Jordan is a fairly safe country. Despite its proximity to Syria, it never felt unsafe or problematic.

Wadi Rum on Jordan itinerary

Crime is quite low, and as a foreigner, you can feel quite safe if you avoid dodgy areas in the dark.

What to Wear in Jordan

If you visit an Islamic (or any conservative) country, the dress code is always very important, and so, these are more very important travel tips for Jordan. Bring trainers and sports clothes because Jordan is a place where you are active. So, prepare for longer or shorter hikes during your visit. Do not forget a scarf/hat as it can be very sunny.

Since Jordan is an Islamic country, I recommend dressing moderately. There is no need to wear a scarf though about 90% of the local women I met wear one.

Just don’t wear the shortest dress you own. However, you don’t have to cover up, and you will be fine wearing shorts and short sleeves. Just be aware of where you are going because it is a conservative country.

You can wear bikinis at the beach, but you will attract negative attention if you show too much skin in general.

Solo female travel in Jordan

I visited Jordan by myself, and I never felt insecure or scared. However, outside of Amman, there are not many women out on the street at all. It is mostly men. Petra, Treasury_

Even in the tourism sector, it is male-dominated, with only a few females in the hotels. While I was aware of that the whole time, I did not feel uncomfortable. People are, even the few women you meet, amiable and talkative.

Is solo female traveling to Jordan a good idea? Yes, it is! Check out my travel tips for solo female travelers.

People in Jordan

The people in Jordan are very friendly and probably some of the nicest and most hospitable people in the world.

One of the things that you will hear often is “welcome.” Jordanians will always ask where you are from and then say, “Welcome, Germany!” (in my case). Compared to other Arabic people, they seem quieter and less pushy.

Language in Jordan

Arabic is the main language, but I found it easy to get around using English. Most people speak English (whether basic or good English), though not everyone, but in the end, I did not have any problems communicating.

Many signs (especially road signs) are in Arabic and English.

Costs / Money in Jordan

The currency of Jordan is the dinar, but many places also accept euros and dollars. Credit cards are not accepted everywhere, and hotels, in particular, may charge 2-3% in credit card fees if you use one. So always have some cash on you. Dollars are widely accepted, and also Euros were accepted in many places. However, I also recommend exchanging some money and have some Dinar on you.

Jordan is quite affordable compared to Western Europe or many cities in the US. However, it is not as cheap as many destinations in Southeast Asia e.g.

Hostel rooms start from around $10, and a room at the Dead Sea (in one of the luxury hotels) is about $200.Dead Sea, Mövenpick pool with a viewYou can find great (but smallish) falafel sandwiches for less than $1 (to go), and if you sit down in one of the restaurants, you might pay $5-15 and more for a dish. Of course, dining in a fancy restaurant is more expensive.

Amman, the Dead Sea, and Petra are probably the most expensive tourist destinations.

Petrol is very cheap – and is less than $1 a liter for Gasoline 90. And thus, taxi and Uber rides are quite affordable (haggle with the taxi drivers BEFORE!). Uber costs less than $3 for several kilometers. Public transportation is also very cheap – from Amman to Jerash, you have to pay less than $2.

However, the visa is pricey, and so is the entrance to Petra. But since you most likely will have a Jordan Pass, you will not have to pay for most museums or other entrance fees.

Accommodation in Jordan

You will find all kinds of accommodation – from basic Bedouin camps to hostel rooms to mid-range accommodation, and of course, you also have all kinds of luxury hotels (especially around Amman, the Dead Sea, and Petra).Dana Nature Reserve at sunset Petra, Amman, and the Dead Sea are quite expensive, but there are also hostels and cheaper hotels in Petra and Amman (not much at the Dead Sea).

Tip: I loved my stays in Bedouin camps – the experiences were amazing. However, as far as I can tell, the blankets do not have sheets. So, if you are a bit picky (as I am), I suggest taking a sleeping bag or so.

Food in Jordan

They have amazing food in Jordan. Even as a vegetarian or vegan, you will find a lot of options. The falafel, I thought, had even more rice than what I had while in Lebanon. They might eat a little more meat in Jordan, but in general, hummus, falafel, and salads are great here.

But I missed great fruits and found myself a little disappointed in the fruit options available.

Smoking in Jordan

Smoking is allowed in many places, and the people in Arabia generally smoke a lot. 

Alcohol in Jordan

This is also allowed and not forbidden. But it is not offered everywhere. Also, if you are in a very conservative area, it is probably best not to drink.

Electricity in Jordan

They use the C, D, F, G, and J plaques in Jordan. The standard frequency is 50 Hz, and it is 230 volts. 

Bidets in Jordan

One thing you will find in Jordan is bidets. These are water pipes that are used to clean your behind properly. Also, you will find the request not to throw toilet paper in the bin, particularly in the smaller hotels. 

Water in Jordan

Jordan is one of the countries with the least amount of water per capita in the world, so be a responsible traveler and don’t misuse or overuse the water.

Attractions in Jordan

Some of Jordan’s main attractions are listed above – for more tips on things to do in Jordan, check out my post with fun things to do in Jordan.Jordan, Wadi Rum solo travel

Hopefully, this post with the best Jordan travel tips will help you plan your trip so that you can have a wonderful and safe trip to this amazing country. Jordan is s full of attractions and places to visit that you should definitely add to your bucket list. And if you are looking for a Jordan itinerary, check out my post on how to spend 7 days in Jordan.

Enjoy Jordan

Enjoy!

Safe Travels, Arzo

HOW TO ROAD TRIP JORDAN – AN EPIC TRIP

Jordan road trip, cover

TIPS FOR A PERFECT JORDAN ROAD TRIP

A Jordan road trip is one of the best trips you can take in the Middle East. Even as a solo female traveler in Jordan I had a blast and congratulated myself for discovering Jordan by car.

This country, the people, the sights, nature, the food… It was an absolutely amazing experience, and luckily, Jordan is also a very safe destination to visit, and the conditions are great for an unforgettable Jordan road trip.

I came to Jordan right after spending time in Lebanon, and I admit, I was worried that Jordanians would drive like Lebanese people. Luckily, they do not. I did not drive myself in Lebanon, and I could not have driven in Jordan if this had been the case. Actually, this Jordan road trip was so relaxed and fun, that I feel I have to recommend it to anyone.

Joran road trip
Shares

DRIVING TIPS FOR YOUR JORDAN ROAD TRIP

Here is some information about driving in Jordan. While I think, that driving in Jordan is/was quite easy and straightforward you should probably be aware of these things before starting your Jordan road trip.

Driving tips for Jordan
Shares

Rules For Driving in Jordan

  • Drive on the right side.
  • You have to wear a seat belt.
  • Driving age: 18. If you want to rent a car: 25 years old.
  • Bring a driver‘s license when renting a car and a credit card (a deposit is charged most times, but you will get refunded if everything is okay).
  • You are not allowed to throw things out of a car – and compared to many other countries in the Middle East, it actually is quite clean.
  • GPS – I had Google Maps and Here We Go. However, sometimes they did not get me where I wanted to go. Since there are some new streets, both apps had problems guiding me. Overall, they worked well, but not perfectly. Make sure to download an offline map before your trip.
  • Signs are in Arabic and English, so you should be fine understanding directions.
  • You will most likely need to rent a car for the road trip and not drive with your own one. When you rent a car, you will get a paper – and if the police give you a fine, it has to be written on that paper, which you have to hand into the rental company when you drop off the car.
  • There are a lot of police stops throughout the country. You could be pulled over at any time, but normally it is fine, and you have to present your papers.
  • P.S. I was pulled over and, apparently, one paper was missing. The rental company did not give it to me. The police charged a fine – I did not have to pay on the spot – and wrote a note on the paper. When I handed that over to the rental company, they said that it would not be a problem and would pay for it… Apparently, they do not always hand over that particular certificate, and so they accept the consequences.
  • Just double-check all the papers when you pick up the car, so you avoid any – unnecessary – problems.
  • Speed limits: Many speed signs will tell you the exact speed limit, but in general: 60 km in cities, 80 km in rural areas, and 120 km on highways.
  • There are speed humps. A lot of them. Many, many of them. They are everywhere. So, always watch out for them because they sometimes even appear out of nowhere – and even if you stick to the speed limit, you very quickly have to sharply reduce your speed if you don’t want your car to be damaged. While speeding in Jordan is less of a problem than in other countries, it sometimes even cause some danger. Anyhow, don’t be surprised by allllll the speed humps.
  • Sometimes, animals are on the street. And sometimes humans are on the street. In the town center near Petra, people sat on the curb (with their legs and feet in the street)… smoking shisha. Some people in groups don’t like to walk behind each other but would rather walk next to each other – even if that means that people walk in the street. So, always watch out.
  • Compared to other countries in the Middle East, driving in Jordan was easy – people mostly stick to their side of the lane. However, never believe that drivers will follow all the rules and drive carefully.
  • Don‘t drink and drive. Unfortunately, this isn’t a global rule (some countries do allow drivers to have a few drinks), but you can’t drive in Jordan if you have had a drink.
  • I saw plenty of petrol/gas stations – however, this does not mean you will find one every 50km. So, whenever you have a longer distance to drive, make sure you refuel your petrol/gas. There is always service, and you can wait in the car while it gets refueled – you have to pay in cash. 
  • Petrol/gas prices are quite affordable – and unlike in Germany, where prices change many times over the course of the day, the prices are more stable and cost about 1€ for 1 liter.
  • One of the reasons I loved Jordan was because of the friendly locals. When I drove through villages and towns, many kids waved at me and were smiling – however, some teenage boys did throw stones at me and my car. My tip: ignore and continue driving when you encounter those teemagers and wave back at the cuties.
  • If you drive at night, double-check your lights as there aren’t many street lights.
  • The King’s Highway: In ancient times, the King’s Highway was a trade route that linked Africa with Mesopotamia. It ran from Egypt to Aqaba, then to Damascus and the Euphrates River. Today, you can still travel along this ancient 280-kilometer-long roadway, passing through tiny villages and mountain towns. Popular attractions include St. George’s Church, the ruins of Mukawir, the site of Umm ar-Rasas, the Crusader castle of Kerak, and Shobak Castle, among many others. This road will also take you from Amman and pass through other popular destinations in Jordan, like Wadi Mujib, Dana National Park, and Petra.
  • Jordan Pass: Most nationalities have to pay for a visa: The Jordan Pass is a pass that you can buy (online or when you arrive in Jordan) and which includes the visa and entry to most attractions in the country. Financially, it makes sense to buy the Jordan Pass if you stay in Jordan for a few days and visit places like Petra or Jerash.
  • Jordan is a very safe country and as a solo female traveler in Jordan, I never had to worry about my security – exercise common sense whether you travel alone or not.

10-Day Jordan road trip
Shares

What Car to Rent for Your Road Trip in Jordan

Renting a car in Jordan is quite straightforward. I used RentalCars to find a car – I picked the smaller car available, which was fine. Later in the mountains, I realized that it was challenging for the small car to drive up the mountains, but it did a good job after all. From what I know now, I suggest not renting a smaller car but probably a medium-sized car.

Unless you have a lot of luggage or you are a group of 5 people, you will not need a big car. Street conditions are good – and a medium-sized car should be fine. A 4wheel car is not needed – for a trip to the desert, I highly suggest, to book a tour.

When renting a car, make sure all damages are well recorded when you pick up the car. You do not to get blamed for damages you did not cause when dropping off the car.

TIP: Get full insurance. I always do that – it is a bit more expensive, but it is less stressful in case anything happens to your car (whether it is your fault or not) and make sure all papers are complete when picking up the car.

With the above driving tips, you should be fine to drive in Jordan. 

Where to Stay – Road Tripping Jordan

While I have hotel recommendations under each stop, you can also check out my Jordan accommodation guide to find the best areas and hotels in Jordan.

Find more general travel tips for Jordan here.

ITINERARY FOR ROAD TRIPPING JORDAN

So, for this Jordan road trip itinerary, you will need a minimum of 5 days. However, 7 or 10 days in Jordan would be much better as you could actually see all places mentioned here. The places mentioned here, can “easily” be explored in 7-10 days.

If you plan a two-week road trip, you will actually have enough time also to rest and relax and spend time at the beach (or in the desert). So, if you can visit Jordan for 2 weeks, then go for it.

With a 5-day Jordan road trip, you have to skip two or three places mentioned here. 

Anyway, here we go. Here are places not to miss when road tripping Jordan.

Jordan Road Trip
Shares

Road Trip Stop 1: Amman

Amman is the capital of Jordan and a hectic and exciting place to visit. It is one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world and well-populated as half of the people in Jordan live here.

I really enjoyed my time in Amman, and I think visiting Amman is one of the best things to do in Jordan. While the city is ancient, there is a mix of both ancient and modern architecture.

View from Citadel in Amman
Shares

Amman is teeming with shops, restaurants, an active nightlife and has a hectic feel as everything always feels like it’s in motion. There are several attractions offered within the city, such as the Roman Amphitheater, downtown Amman with its souks, and the Citadel’s views. 

Entry to most attractions is free with your Jordan Pass.

Tip: I recommend spending one or two days in Amman – and discover the city WITHOUT a car. It is hectic and busy and parking in the city center is probably a pain. Unless you enjoy driving in busy places, then Amman is a good place to drive.

But for all others: Make Amman your starting point of the road trip and pick up the car after your time in Amman (or make it the endpoint of the trip). Then head from Amman to Jerash – it takes about 1 hour to get to Jerash and is about 50km (depending on where you pick up your rental car).

You can get around on foot, take a bus or an Uber if needed in Amman.

WHERE TO STAY IN AMMAN

  • I stayed in Nomads Hostel Hotel (and another place that isn’t worth mentioning). It was very conveniently located near Rainbow Street and made it easy for me to connect with other female travelers. The hostel is fun, modern, and clean, with a great location. Check it out here because it surely is a perfect budget accommodation.
  • For a mid-range hotel option, I suggest Albasem Hotel, because it is well-rated and centrally located. Check out rates and availabilities here.
  • For a luxury hotel, try The House Boutique Suites, which is also near Rainbow Street (which is probably one of the best places to stay) and offers lots of amenities.  Find out more about the hotel here.

Road Trip Stop 2: Jerash

Dating back almost 6,500 years, Jerash is located just north of Amman and in the northwest part of Jordan. I think there is no way to skip Jerash when you do this road trip.

Jerash Theater in Jordan
Shares

It is one of the best-preserved cities from the Roman Empire’s rule and is really amazing. It was rediscovered about 70 years ago and got restored. You can explore many attractions in Jerash, including the 2nd-century Hadrian’s Arch (aka Triumphal Arch), the South Gate, the forum, the hippodrome, the Corinthian columns of the Temple of Artemis, and the Temple of Zeus, among others. The Jerash Archaeological Museum also exhibits its finds for viewing.

Tip: I recommend renting a car now and getting to Jerash after a day or two in Amman. Driving from Amman to Jerash is hasslefree. Plan half a day for a trip to Jerash (max. one day if you are really into history) and then head to the Dead Sea. Entry is free with your Jordan Pass.

After a few hours or a full day in Jerash head to the Dead Sea, which is a 1,5 – 2 hours drive (95km).

Road Trip Stop 3: Dead Sea

The Dead Sea is located along the western border of Jordan and is the lowest point on the planet (it is more than 400 meters below sea level). It surely is a must-see for any Jordan road trip.

Dead Sea, Mövenpick pool with a view
Shares
It is so salty that you cannot swim in it because you only float. And even though you cannot swim there, it is fun to float and also, the mud from the Dead Sea can be used to soften your skin. Even Cleopatra was known to do it. You do not have to believe Cleopatra´s word but I tell you: it really works.

So, the minerals in the mud make it a natural spa destination, and the beaches are also popular.

Most of the access to the beach (Dead Sea) is private and belongs to the resorts in the area – but there is a public beach to enjoy.

Tip: Many people visit the Dead Sea on their way back to Amman – because this is the place to chill and relax. I did not wait until the end – I was ready for a day in luxury accommodation and wanted to get pampered.

If you plan a 5-day road trip, I would probably just visit for a few hours, but if you road tip Jordan in 7 days, stay a night here and chill before you get to experience some adventure. I would continue my journey around 10 am and visit a real highlight in Jordan, which is quite close.

BEST PLACES TO STAY AT DEAD SEA

  • I stayed at the Mövenpick Resort & Spa. My room was nice but a little outdated, especially in the bathroom, but the bed was comfortable (I had an amazing sleep), and the staff is amiable. The hotel was done in the Arabic style, and breakfast and dinner were included. But you can also book it without any dinner/breakfast/lunch. I would say it was definitely worth the money and my first choice for staying at the Dead Sea. Check out rates here.
  • The Ma’in Hot Springs Resort & Spa is also a good place to stay, situated among beautiful mountain landscapes and offering relaxing spa amenities. It is a bit more expensive than Mövenpick Hotel – find out more about this luxury hotel here.
  • For a budget option, try the Dead Sea Spa Hotel, a well-rated 4-star hotel with great amenities and private beach access. Find the rates here.

Driving around the Dead Sea is easy and hotels normally offer free parking. Then it is time to visit Wadi Mujib. It takes about 90 minutes to get there (depending on where you stay at the Dead Sea) and is about 75km.

Road Trip Stop 4: Wadi Mujib

Wadi Mujib is a river canyon where the Mujib River empties into the Dead Sea, making the area the lowest nature reserve in the world at 420 meters below sea level.

Wadi Mujib in Jordan is one of the fun places to go in Jordan
Shares

The Wadi Mujib Gorge is a stunning place and a fun and exciting destination while in Jordan. You can hike the area, climb stairs under waterfalls, cross through the water, and float in between the gorge. The water is filled with the little fish often used for “pedicures.”

This is a very adventurous place to visit and was one of the highlights during my road trip.

Tip: It is closed in the winter months (exact times depend on the actual weather conditions, but it might close mid-October for a few months). You can get there from your way from the Dead Sea to Dana, and it will take a few hours (or up to a day, depending on which tour you want to do).

There is an entrance fee (not covered by the Jordan Pass) that is about 25€ – you can only pay in cash – and then you can rent a guide. I did hire a personal guide for another 25€, and it was absolutely amazing. I did the shortest – yet not easiest – hike through the gorge, and it was just better than expected.

I am an active person, though not very sporty, and it was not always easy but definitely doable with the help of a guide (and if you are active and fit, you can do it yourself!). Bring suitable shoes with you! I would try to leave Wadi Mujib at around 3 pm so you can experience the sunset at this gorgeous place that I am talking about now.

From Wadi Mujib head south towards to Dana Nature Reserve. It takes about 2 hours (150km).

Road Trip Stop 5: Dana

Located between Petra and the Dead Sea, Dana is a lesser-known stop, and many don’t add it to a Jordan road trip but features stunning sights.

Dana Nature Reserve at sunset
Shares

The Dana Nature Reserve encompasses about 300km around Dana Village and Wadi Dana.

It is inhabited by the Al Atata Tribe, who have been living there for 6,000 years. Popular among hikers, Dana offers many hiking trails. Wadi Dana, a canyon, is also visited for its natural beauty and views. The town of Dana is about 500 years old, and you can see many aspects from the 19th century well-preserved and still present today. 

Tip: This place is a bit more off-the-beaten-path. But if you are into hiking or hidden gems, you should not miss out. I am not a hiking fan, but I did a short hike. But most of all, I loved the sunset in Dana. Accommodation here is mostly very basic, yet it is a great place for any Jordan road trip itinerary.

WHERE TO STAY IN DANA

  • I stayed at Al Nawatef Bedouin Camp – it is an elementary camp. You have shared toilets, and mattresses were not great. However, I still recommend it because the views are great (and sunset from here is top!), and the food was great. They also offer guided hiking tours (from a few hours to a 2-day hiking trip). So, I definitely recommend staying here (plus it is very budget-friendly). Check out their rates here.
  • If you are looking for a bit more comfort, you will probably find it at Mount Dana Hotel. You can check out their rates and amenities.

From Dana, it is time to head even further south. It takes about 1 hour to get to Petra from Al Nawatef Bedouin Camp (50km).

Road Trip Stop 6: Petra

Petra is perhaps the most visited place in Jordan and one of the best stops for your road trip. Located in the southwestern part of the country, it was the Nabatean kingdom’s prosperous capital around 1 BC.

Petra, Treasury_
Shares

It flourished under Roman rule but was then destroyed by an earthquake in 4 AD.

Only the Bedouins remained after that until a Swiss explorer re-discovered it in the 19th century. Some attractions in Petra are the Siq, the Theater, the Treasury (Al Khazna), the Monastery (Ad Deir), the Royal Tombs, and Colonnade Street. You can also visit a nearby Nabatean site that was built around the same time as Petra.

Tip: Petra is huge…I am serious. You can’t see it in a few hours. You will be able to the Siq and the Treasury, but you won’t see the main attractions. You would need more than a day for all that. I booked a 3-day pass with my Jordan Pass, but I only visited on two days because I somehow felt it gets repetitive (apps, yes, I said it), and some places looked similar.

There is a lot of walking, and some hiking included – wear comfy shoes and never, never ride a donkey.

There are terribly treated (from what I saw), and if you need a ride, you can take an electric minibus for some parts. Even though they don’t take you up all the way to mountain peaks, I guess it is not an option to ride a donkey, so bring enough drinks and snacks (though there are stalls where you can buy all that) and prepare for some nice walks.

Petra By Night was a little disappointing – too many people, too loud, and too short. It wasn’t worth the money, in my opinion (and it is not covered with the Jordan Pass).

WHERE TO STAY IN PETRA

  • The Mövenpick Resort is a very nice luxury hotel located just next to Petra (so perfectly located). But it is very popular and fills up fast, so if you want to stay there, then I suggest you book early. Check out rates here.
  • Another beautiful place to stay near Petra is the Hyatt Zaman – while it is rated as a 3-star hotel, it actually is a beautiful luxury hotel about 15 minutes drive from Petra. It was my favorite place to stay in Jordan, and I definitely recommend staying there. It is a great choice if you don’t have to watch your budget closely. Check out the hotel here.
  • You can stay in Wadi Musa at the Cleopatra Hotel for a cheaper option, which is only 2 km away from Petra. It is a simple place to stay but was fine for the 2 nights I stayed there as it is close to the main attractions. Read more about the hotel here.

From Petra, head to the next stunning place in Jordan – Wadi Rum. It takes about 90minutes (100km) to get to Wadi Rum (Visitor Center).

Road Trip Stop 7: Wadi Rum

There is absolutely no way to skip Wadi Rum on your Jordan road trip. Wadi Rum, also known as Valley of the Moon, was named a UNESCO World Heritage site for its cultural and natural significance.

Wadi Rum on Jordan itinerary
Shares

Inhabited by the Nabataeans in prehistoric times, this area has a unique landscape and stunning views. It is also the largest wadi in Jordan. It is famous for its red-pink desert sands, natural arches, mountains, and prehistoric rock engravings.

Wadi Rum also became well-known as a filming location for movies, such as Lawrence of Arabia. Other attractions include the Burdah Rock Bridge, Al Hasany Dunes, and the Khazali Siq.

Tip: I suggest staying at least one night in Wadi Rum. Most other visitors only come for a day (for few hours), but they miss out on a magical night. There are several camps (unfortunately, the one I stayed in is closed atm) and it was amazing. Basically, all camps offer tours for the day. And do have dinner/breakfast and lunch if you stay with them overnight and book a tour.

You should not drive with your own car in the desert. The desert is huge, and you would need a 4 wheel drive and should have at least some experience driving in sand. You can leave your car at the visitor center and then pick it up from the company you booked the tour/accommodation with. It sounds complicated but is quite easy if you book in advance.

WHERE TO STAY IN WADI RUM

  • I stayed in an excellent camp, but it seems the owner has some troubles with the police and it was closed?! I am not sure, but you cannot book it anymore, and the last review looked like this. Anyhow, you should not worry.
  • Make sure that you ask about the tours once you have your accommodation booked. This camp looks pretty similar to the camp I stayed at, and they also offer tours, so once you have your night booked, then email them and ask about tours.
  • Check out this luxury camp that offers beautiful rooms with great views.

From Wadi Rum you could either head back to Amman or get to Aqaba. Aqaba is in the very south and it takes about 1 hour (60km) to get there from Wadi Rum Visitor Center. 

Road Trip Stop 8: Aqaba

Located in the southern part of Jordan, Aqaba is the only coastal city in the country. This port city is situated off the Gulf of Aqaba in the Red Sea.

It is a popular destination for those who enjoy diving, windsurfing, snorkeling, and other water sports. It also has a rich history, dating back to 4,000 BC when it was first inhabited. Some attractions to see here are the Yamanieh coral reef and the Aqaba Fort. There are many beach resorts here as well, but this city generally attracts lovers of water sports.

Since I, personally, had not added Aqaba to my road trip, I actually can’t say much as I am not into diving and am also not a beach person. However, it is very popular with people who like to dive. Aqaba is probably one of the best places to chill and rest – so, if you road trip Jordan for more than 7 days, then you will have time to do so here.

WHERE TO STAY IN AQABA

For accommodations, you can stay at Al Manara Hotel in Aqaba, a luxury resort highly rated for its location, service, and amenities.

A more mid-range hotel would be the Lacosta Hotel, close to the beach and other attractions and often includes breakfast.

A budget option would be the Amir Palace Hotel, a charming boutique hotel in the city center.

Tip: This could be your last stop – and from here, you could head back to Amman or continue your journey (many visit Israel afterward). If you go back straight to Amman it will take around 5-6 hours (330km). 

Road Trip Stop 9: Amman

Aqaba – or Wadi Rum – is quite far from Amman. If your flight is from Amman, it is time to head back north. It takes time, so make sure to leave early – or better, book your last night in Amman, so you don’t have to stress.

As great as driving in Jordan is, it always can happen that something happens with your car or streets are closed, so plan in enough time for the drive back.

PLACES TO STAY IN AMMAN

Though I mentioned it above, here are three places that are probably great fits for all budgets.

  • Nomads Hostel Hotel: Check it out here because it surely is a perfect budget accommodation.
  • Albasem Hotel is well-rated and centrally located. Check out rates and availabilities here.
  • The House Boutique Suites is also near Rainbow Street (which is probably one of the best places to stay) and offers lots of amenities.  Find out more about the hotel here.

FINAL THOUGHTS OF MY JORDAN ROAD TRIP

Jordan is such an amazing country. Unfortunately, public transportation is not great, and so the best way to experience Jordia is on a road trip. As mentioned, I traveled as a solo female traveler and I loved it! So, whether you plan a road trip in Jordan by yourself, with friends or family, or alone – just do it.

Jordanians are very relaxed, friendly, and always happy to help and I am sure you will have a great time!

Stay safe and great travels!

best Jordan road trip, travel tips and more for Pinterest
Shares

Safe Travels, Arzo
Shares

WHERE TO STAY IN JORDAN (ALL AREAS & BUDGETS) FOR AN AMAZING TRIP

BEST PLACES TO STAY IN JORDAN – GREAT AREAS AND HOTELS FOR ALL BUDGETS

Are you planning your Jordan trip and wondering about where to stay in Jordan? Then this post is for you. Find out about the best places to stay in Jordan, the best areas, and hotels for all budgets.

The country of Jordan is absolutely amazing. It has become a trendy tourist destination, and for a good reason. This is one of the most beautiful places not only in the Middle East but also in the world. Jordan has so much to offer, from stunning scenery to small cute villages and fun cities.

It is a great place to visit for anyone, whether you are an adventurer, a family, or a solo female traveler. Jordan is very safe. And let’s not forget Jordan’s generous hospitality.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links which means I might earn a small commission when you buy a product (at no extra cost to you) after clicking on my link. More about it here.

Amman

Amman is the capital of Jordan, so of course, you must make a stop here. This conservative and traditional Arabic city is full of fun and activity. It is very modern, and with about 4 million people living here, also very hectic and busy.

Amman citadel is one of the best places to see in Jordan

This city is the perfect place to either start or end your Jordan trip. It’s also in a convenient location, making it easy to take a day trip to Jerash, which is only 48 km north of the capital. 

I would suggest staying for 1 night if you plan to be in Jordan for at least 7 days.

Where to Stay in Amman

  • I stayed in Nomads Hostel Hotel while I was here. It was very conveniently located near Rainbow Street and made it easy for me to connect with other female travelers. The hostel was fun, modern, and clean, with a great location. Check it out here.
  • For a mid-range hotel option, I suggest Albasem Hotel, which is well-rated and centrally located. Check out rates and availabilities here.
  • For a luxury hotel, try The House Boutique Suites, which is also near Rainbow Street and offers lots of amenities.  Find out more about the hotel here.

Dead Sea

The Dead Sea is located along the western shores of Jordan and is a great place to visit in Jordan. This salt lake is situated at the lowest land elevation in the world. If you are visiting this fun locale, one night is enough to experience it. 

Dead Sea, Mövenpick pool with a view

You should know that there are only luxury hotels here, which are quite expensive.

But staying at one is great if you are looking to relax at the hotel’s private beach or layout by the pool after a few busy days in Jordan – or if you need a place to refuel before the real adventure begins.

Best Places to Stay at the Dead Sea

  • I stayed at the Mövenpick Resort & Spa. The staff was really nice and very polite. My room was nice but a little outdated, especially in the bathroom, but the bed was comfortable. The hotel was done in the Arabic style, and breakfast and dinner were included. I would say it was definitely worth the money. Check out rates here.
  • The Ma’in Hot Springs Resort & Spa is also a good place to stay, situated among beautiful mountain landscapes and offering relaxing spa amenities. Find out more about this luxury hotel here.
  • The Kempinski Hotel is another luxury accommodation here, which sits at the edge of this famous salt lake. Find out about the rates here.
  • For a budget option, try the Dead Sea Spa Hotel, a well-rated 4-star hotel with great amenities and private beach access. Find the rates here.

Petra

The next great place to stay in Jordan is the country’s most famous and most popular area. This is not just because Indiana Jones was filmed here, though that does increase its popularity.

No, it is also because Petra has been declared one of the world’s new Seven Wonders. 

It is just amazing. You must stay in Petra during your time in Jordan. There is so much to do, and it is so huge that you will not be able to see everything in one day. You will need to stay over at least one night. 

Best Places to Stay in Petra / Wadi Musa

  • The Mövenpick Resort is a very nice luxury hotel located just next to Petra. But it is very popular and fills up fast, so if you want to stay there, then I suggest you book early. It really is the perfect location. Check out rates here.
  • Another beautiful place to stay near Petra is the Hayat Zaman Hotel And Resort Petra. It actually is a beautiful luxury hotel about 15 minutes drive from Petra. It was my favorite place to stay in Jordan. Great if you don’t have to watch your budget closely. Check out the hotel here.

  • For a cheaper option, you can stay in Wadi Musa at the Cleopatra Hotel. It is only 2 km away from Petra. It is a simple place to stay but was fine for 2 nights as it is close to the main attractions. Read more about the hotel here.

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum is a must-see place. Known as the Valley of the Moon, it is the largest wadi in Jordan, and so it doesn’t surprise that it is one of the best places to stay in Jordan.

There are several options to stay in Wadi Rum.

My tip is to stay in a Beduin camp. Though they are made to appeal to visitors from around the world and have been adapted for this purpose, they still feel authentic. There are quite a few camps ranging from simple to luxurious, and most of them also offer desert tours.

I advise that you stay overnight so that you can watch the sunset over the wadi. Though it can rain, the experience is worth it.

My suggestion is to arrive in the late afternoon/evening, end your day in the camp, have dinner at the fire camp (and watch the sunset), and then do a full-day tour the next morning. If you do a full-day tour, it ends around 5 or 6 pm, so you can then spend another night in the camp and then depart in the early morning.

The Bedouin camps will normally breakfast to guests. And you can also have dinner on request. If you do a full-day safari tour, lunch is included with a tour.

While there, I stayed in a simple but nice camp that I booked through Booking.com. However, that camp is – for unknown reasons closed now.

Where to Stay in Wadi Rum

Make sure that you ask about the tours once you have your accommodation booked.

  • This camp looks pretty similar to the camp I stayed at, and they also offer tours, so once you have your night booked, then email them and ask about tours.
  • Check out this luxury camp that offers beautiful rooms with great views.

Aqaba

Aqaba is a port city in Jordan that is located on the Red Sea’s Gulf of Aqaba in the south of Jordan. It is a top destination for water sports lovers.

I didn’t go here because I don’t dive or snorkel, and with only a bit more than 7 days in Jordan, I had to set priorities about the places to visit. Still, Aqaba is very popular among visitors and a great place if you like windsurfing, scuba diving, etc.  

The Yamanieh coral reef found at the Aqaba Marine Park is a favored dive site, and if you are into this, then Aqaba is a great place to stay in Jordan.

Best Places to Stay in Aqaba

  • You can stay at Al Manara Hotel in Aqaba. It is a luxury resort highly rated for its location, service, and amenities.
  • A more mid-range hotel would be the Lacosta Hotel, close to the beach and other attractions and often includes breakfast.
  • A budget option would be the Amir Palace Hotel, a charming boutique hotel in the city center.

Dana Reservation Camp

On the way from the Dead Sea to Petra, you will find the less popular and famous Dana Nature Reserve. Despite not being as well-known as other places in Jordan, Dana is gorgeous.

Dana Nature Reserve at sunset

Everything here is quite simple, but it is the place for seeing great sunsets and hiking. Normally, all hotels and Bedouin camps offer hiking tours, which you can join for a fee. 

Whether you are staying a full day, two days, or even longer, this is a great place to visit in Jordan. It is a little different than the other spots you will see in the country, but that is part of its appeal. Once you have booked your accommodations, ask about the tours.

Jordan is an amazing country with so many places to see. Picking the right accommodation can help you really enjoy the experience in each city you visit and make it easier for you to explore the country’s landmarks.

Whether it is a 5-star luxury hotel (which does not really exist in Dana) or a tent in a Bedouin camp, you will get to see and experience the true beauty of Jordan if you pick the right activities and the perfect accommodation for you.

Where to Stay in Dana

  • I stayed at Al Nawatef Bedouin Camp – it is a very basic camp. You have shared toilets, and mattresses were not great. However, I still recommend it because the views are great (and sunset from here is top!), and the food was great. So, I definitely recommend staying here (plus it is very budget-friendly). Check out their rates here.
  • If you are looking for a bit more comfort, you will probably find it at Mount Dana Hotel. You can check out their rates and amenities.

CONCLUSION: WHERE TO STAY IN JORDAN

As stunning as Jordan is, staying in one place and only do day trips is not the best idea. So, traveling around – and changing hotels – is the best way to see the country. 

I hope these tips will also help you create your Jordan itinerary, but of course, I also hope you have found the answer to your question on where to stay in Jordan and now know which hotels and areas to choose when planning your Jordan trip (whether you do a road trip or do day trips).

READ MORE: Solo female travel in Jordan

Safe Travels, Arzo

Fun Things to do in Amman (1 or 2 Days)

Best things to do in Amman, Jordan in 2 days

WHAT TO DO IN AMMAN

Amman is a crazy, hectic, busy city typical for an Arabian city, but it is still different.

Jordan’s capital is a good starting or endpoint if you are doing a Jordan road trip. While some people don’t spend much time here or skip it altogether, you should spend at least one day here, if you can arrange it. It probably is not the highlight in the country but still worth a visit.

If you plan your trip and are wondering about the best things to do in Amman in 1 or 2 days, then read on and find out about the top activities plus travel tips.

It is a great historic city with a lot to offer – including lots of authentic places and ancient sights. It is also quite modern with nightlife and modern buildings outside the downtown area. Since it is in a hilly area, you have great views and can catch some beautiful sunsets.

And let’s not forget the numerous restaurants and take-aways that serve great (and affordable) food! Yes, there are many reasons to add Amman to your Jordan itinerary visit Amman and here are some places to see and things to experience.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links which means I will earn a small commission when you buy a product via my link (no extra cost to you). More about it here.

TRAVEL TIPS FOR YOUR AMMAN ITINERARY

Before talking about what to do in Amman, here are a few travel tips.

Best time to visit Amman

  • March until May is the busiest time in Jordan and thus Amman. The weather is quite moderate and warm (it can get quite hot in the summer months and chilly in the winter).
  • I visited in October, which is also a good time. The weather was pleasant most of the time, and there was little rain. Also, November is a good time to visit.
  • However, if you are looking for a less busy season, consider visiting in December or the hot summer months.

How to Arrive in Amman

Most likely, you will arrive in Amman at the airport.

  • From there, you can take an official airport taxi. Prices are fixed (about $30 to downtown Amman), and you get a receipt/voucher outside the terminal to take to the taxi.
  • Uber works in Amman, but apparently, they cannot pick you up from the Amman airport.
  • There is also a bus running once or twice an hour that costs about $4 (buy tickets at the ticket office outside the terminal). You can get off the North Station and then either take a cab or an Uber. From there, it is about $2-4 to get to your hotel in/near downtown.

Getting Around Amman

In Amman, you can easily get around by buses, shared or regular taxis, Uber, or guided tours/personal drivers.

Though I loved my road trip in Jordan, I was happy I did not drive in Amman myself. Personally, I would not have loved driving in Amman. Driving in an Arabic capital can often feel crazy – and so it does in Amman.

Many sights are located Downtown (also those mentioned in the Amman itinerary). You might want to grab a taxi here or there – in this case, discuss the price beforehand (and $2 gets you a few kilometers).

Here are more travel tips for Jordan.

Where to stay in Amman

  • I am normally not a big hostel fan. But I stayed at Nomad Hostel for one night and loved it. This is a good choice for solo travelers – a good location, a nice hostel, friendly staff, and clean rooms. Check out the hostel and its rates here.
  • For a mid-range hotel option, I suggest Albasem Hotel, which is well-rated and centrally located. Check out rates and availabilities here.
  • For a luxury hotel, try The House Boutique Suites, which is also near Rainbow Street and offers lots of amenities.  Find out more about the hotel here.

Jordan Pass

  • If you go to Jordan, you will likely have to pay for a visa. It is $56 for a tourist visa upon arrival. What does this have to do with Amman? Of course, it depends on which country you are from.
  • Well, I truly recommend getting a Jordan Pass if you are staying more than 4 days. It includes your visa plus is your entry ticket for many attractions.
  • The cheapest version is around $100. With it, you also gain entrance to Petra (which is quite expensive and is $70 for a day pass), entrance to Jerash, access to attractions in Amman and entrance into many more museums.
  • So, if you visit Amman with a Jordan Pass, you don’t have to think about entrance fees for tourist attractions in Amman or about your visa.
  • You can buy the Jordan Pass in person or online.

PLACES TO VISIT IN AMMAN IN 1 DAY

Okay, here are the top places to visit and things to do on day 1 in Amman.

Grand Husseini Mosque

Start your day in Amman Downtown and head to this mosque: the Grand Husseini Mosque.  Mosque in AmmanBuilt in 1932 by the late King Abdullah I, it is one of the city’s oldest mosques. I must admit, I almost passed it because it looks – compared to other mosques in the Middle East – quite humble from the outside.

  • As a foreigner, you can visit the inside if you dress appropriately.
  • Since I didn’t have a scarf with me to cover my head, I skipped going inside. Make sure you bring one with you as a female traveler.

Roman Theater

Then head to the Roman Theater, which was probably built around 138 AD, and it is another top Amman activity. Back then, it could hold about 6,000 people and is still really impressive today. It was restored in 1970 and is now used for civic activities, concerts, and graduations. And is one of the main places to visit in Amman.

  • Jordan Pass holders have free entrance.

Falafel & Fresh Juice

You should definitely have a lot of food in Amman. It is quite affordable to eat here (compared to Western Europe and the US), especially takeaway food. So, falafel for the win.

Hashim is a popular place where I went for food, and it was very affordable. For 2€, I had falafel, a drink, bread, and a salad. So, make sure to eat your weight in falafel because it was just amazing and tastes different from other countries.

Only downside: They use A LOT of plastic which led to a bad taste in my mouth (not figuratively).

However, you can also get small falafel sandwiches for less than 1€, and they are amazing at one of the takeaway shops.

And then have fresh juice afterward! you will see a couple of shops selling fresh juices. And as a fresh juice lover, I can say that they are amazing. I always have a refillable bottle with me and just asked them to pour my juice into that – no need for more plastic use in Amman. The prices were about 1,30€ for around for almost half a liter.

Al Balad (Downtown Amman)

There are many restaurants, souvenir shops, and all kinds of stores and shops, and it is all kinds of crazy here. So, make sure to be prepared for that and enjoy. I am not a big shopper, but I got some souvenirs for my little nephews from here. Shopping in AmmanSo, if you are looking for presents, souvenirs for yourself or Arabian clothes, then Al Balad is the place to visit. And if you are not into shopping, then it is still a fun place to visit in Amman, and strolling the area is actually one of the best things to do in Amman.

I liked it more in the evening than during the daytime. As in Arabic countries common, shops are open until late so you can combine your evening stroll here with some shopping, eating and more.

The Citadel

From Al Balad, head to the Citadel – visiting was one of my highlights in Amman. Amman citadelYou can also kill two birds with one stone when you visit it. First of all, you have amazing views because the Citadel is located on Citadel Hill, known as Jabal al-Qal’a, and this is amazing for watching the sunset and even staying after it has set.

Also, the Citadel is one of the most ancient places to visit in Amman, and you can visit the museum and learn all about the history of the city.

  • Opening hours vary, so check them out before your visit.
  • Free with the Jordan Pass.

Rainbow Street

In the evening, check out Rainbow Street. It was a little less spectacular during the day, but at night, this is where you want to be. Rainbow Street is one of the best places to visit in Amman, Jordan in 2 daysHave dinner, drinks – there are so many bars. Also, check out the side streets for beautiful cafes, restaurants, and street art. I personally really enjoyed it in the evening, so come here to end your day.

My favorite side street was Ahmad Bin Toloon Street with the prettiest street art, cafes, restaurants, and decoration.

Street Art

Talking about street art – there is quite a lot of street art in the downtown area. This is not an extra stop on your Ammanitinerary, but I suggest keeping an eye out for the murals.

I made the mistake of walking all the way from the Boulevard to Al Balad, thinking there would be a lot going on. Funnily, there wasn’t much going on.  

However, there was a lot of street art that you should check out, and it is probably not what you would expect in a city like this – often with a political message.

Above mentioned places/activities can be done in one day in Amman. If you have more time, you can do some of the following activities in/near Amman.

THINGS TO DO IN AMMAN IN 2 DAYS

So, if you have only 1 day in Amman, then above mentioned activities will cover some of the best places. However, there are a few more activities to add for day 2 in Amman. Especially the trip to Jerash is a must.

Go to Jerash

Jerash, which is about an hour’s drive from Amman, is a must-see place. So, don’t miss out on this half-day trip to visit one of the best-preserved and largest Roman towns in the world.

Hopefully, this post has helped you find the best places to visit and things to do while in Amman. It is a vibrant city with a lot to offer, so enjoy!  

Hamam

You could end your two days in Amman with some time at a haman.

Normally, I always take time out to experience a Hamam, a Turkish bath. Quite a few of the hamans in Amman had bad reviews, and I then stopped looking.

However, but there are a few that are supposedly very good. So, if you have some time off and want to relax, then go to a Hamam. Amman is so crazy – especially Downtown – that a few hours in a haman seems to be a perfect way to relax in an Arabic way.

—-

Traveling to Jordan as a solo female traveler? Then check out my solo female travel guide for Jordan.

Yes, visiting Amman is one of the best things to do in Jordan. With two days in Amman, you can manage to see the main highlights. Still, as always, you scratch the surface of an exciting city with much more to offer than just the things mentioned above, but even with one day in Amman, you will get a good glimpse of the city and what it has to offer.

Safe Travels, Arzo

Solo Female Travel in Jordan

TRAVELING TO JORDAN ALONE – SOLO TRAVELING TO JORDAN

Traveling to Jordan as a solo female traveler? Well, some might think it is scary to go to Jordan alone but believe me, there is nothing scary about it.

And if you are wondering about “solo female travel in Jordan” this post can help you plan your trip and find out about the best things to do, about main things to keep in mind when traveling to Jordan alone, and more solo tips.Things to do in Jordan alone, solo travel tips

I do believe that women should travel (solo) and also visit countries different from their own country.

Yes, Jordan is a conservative, Muslim country, and this alone might scare some people away, especially solo female travelers.

But I personally think that Jordan is an amazing country to travel to by yourself.

In general, I love a lot of places in the Middle East as a solo female traveler because, despite the perception we have, I feel safe in most of these countries. No, I do not recommend all countries in the Middle East for solo travelers but Jordan, in particular, is an amazing place to travel solo.Petra, Treasury_

Solo Female Travel Tips for Jordan

If you were wondering about security, what to wear as a solo female, things to know, and dos and don’ts, here are my tips. If you want to know what things to do if you come to Jordan alone, keep reading as this post is for you.

Is Jordan Safe for Solo Travelers?

Jordan is a safe country, and one of the safest in the Middle East. This region is problematic, but Jordan doesn’t face any war in the near future that we are aware of. Crime toward tourists is quite low.

I can say that Jordan is a very safe country to visit. Of course, there are some tourist scams, but much less than in other countries that I have visited. And none of them felt scary or frightening.

Just be aware of your surroundings, especially if you are in Amman or more conservative places. Don’t walk out at night in dodgy places. But overall, as a female traveler, people might look at you, but I never felt unsafe.Jordan, Wadi Rum solo travel

Welcome to Jordan!

This is probably the thing you will hear the most from the airport staff, the hotel staff, and the restaurant workers.

They will ask where you are from and then welcome you to Jordan. I found that Jordanians were friendlier but also more reserved, and not as loud or pushy as people in other Arabian countries, especially when you go to the shops. Which felt totally pleasant (some exceptions in busy Amman Downtown)

Of course, they will try to sell you something, but it is not as extreme as in other places. People are extremely friendly.

Taxi drivers are known for trying to charge more for shorter rides, but I had some great experiences with the drivers in Jordan. In general, people are friendly here.

You will not see many women. But the ones you do see will smile at you and were in general very friendly.

Children will wave at you as you drive by when they realize that you are a foreigner – this is probably one of the sweetest memories I have from Jordan. The cute and friendly kids. Okay, there were a few boys who threw stones at my car as I passed them, but apart from that, even the children are overly friendly.

What to wear as a Solo Female Traveler in Jordan

Jordan is quite conservative. Outside of Amman, you will not see many women (if you see any at all) who are not wearing scarves. But you don’t have to wear one. You can wear shorts and tank tops.

You don’t have to cover your arms, legs, or head. At the beach at the Dead Sea, you can wear a bikini, as well as at the hotel pools. But keep in mind that you will stand out, negatively, if you show too much skin. So, dress moderately and be respectful.

In general, I advise wearing comfortable shoes because Jordan is a mountainous country and Amman is hilly. You will likely do a lot of walking. For Amman, dress more for comfort than fashion – you can save your fancier clothes for when you go out.

Bring a scarf with you in case you want to visit a mosque, or in case you wanted to cover up your bare arms in certain situations.

Things not to do For Traveling Alone

My plan is always to not attract too much attention negatively. It’s always nice to learn a few words when going to a new place, like “shukraan,” which means “thank you,” and other Arabic words.

Familiarize yourself with local customs and traditions. You will be offered tea a lot and people will talk to you.

Don’t drink alcohol on the streets. Don’t curse loudly. Don’t cause negative tension.

And if you road trip, don’t drive too fast because there will be a lot of speed bumps!

Where to stay When You Travel Solo

Here’s the thing: As a solo female traveler, I felt a little uncomfortable about staying in the Bedouin camps before I arrived because I wasn’t sure if they would be safe enough. 

Once, I booked the “fancier” but still basic, accommodation and there was no locker that closed properly. You could also more or less see through the window, which made me a little uncomfortable.

But it was fine. I was fine. I was told that I didn’t have to worry as a woman. But that can happen if you stay in a Bedouin camp.  I still recommend them though, even if you are traveling by yourself. I just offer the tip to be aware, no matter where you go. 

There are some hostels where you can stay. Female and male dorms are normally separate. I stayed in a hostel in Amman. There are some in Petra and Wadi Musa, too. If you want to meet people, this is a great place to do it.

Otherwise, there are many different luxury hotels, basic hotels, and hotels as well as apartments, but if you want to socialize, then I advise staying at Bedouin camps in Wadi Rum and Dana Nature Reserve or staying in a  hostel.

How to get around as a Solo Traveler

Whenever possible, I use public transportation but public transportation in Jordan is not perfect if you want to see a lot of places. If you stay in Amman and want to do a few day trips, public transportation is fine.

Public transportation is, in general, very cheap. It brings you to many main attractions, but it doesn’t run very often. But you can feel safe when you travel alone using it.

If you are by yourself, I would definitely advise getting around by car. It is the most comfortable and easiest way, even though it can get expensive – though petrol is very cheap in Jordan.

If you want to get around on a budget, you could always get a shared taxi – you would have to ask the taxi to pick up other people to share. In a hostel, you can ask others to share a taxi or Uber.

Things to do in Jordan Alone

I have a more comprehensive post on things to do in Jordan, but if you are wondering about the best things to do alone in Jordan, you can pretty much do everything. I went to Jordan alone and made some friends. But I was only with them one or two nights or days, depending on when I met them, but then continued on my journey alone. 

Amman

In Amman, you can definitely explore the downtown area by yourself. However, there are a lot of international people if you want to connect with them. If you stay in a hostel it will be even easier to meet other people and explore the city with others.

But the locals will also talk with you – I most often do talk more to locals when I am by myself. It feels quite safe to go out to this crazy place by yourself and explore the ancient sights and busy downtown.

Wadi Rum

Wadi Rum is a place where you will most likely meet people – if you want to.I met some really cute Dutch girls at a Bedouin Camp and who I got along with very well. We had dinner together the first night in the Bedouin camp and spend some time together on the desert safari.

Most likely, unless you want to have a private tour, you will meet people. It is really difficult to explore Wadi Rum on your own – not impossible, but hard – so you will most likely land up booking a tour. Whether you do Wadi Rum by yourself or with others in a group – this is a fun activity not to miss out.

Dead Sea

The Dead Sea is another fun place you can do it by yourself. The hotels are full of international visitors but I enjoyed the time by myself and did not feel the need to make friends.Mud at the Dead Sea, JordanIf you prefer some time to relax and chill, then a beach/pool day at the Dead Sea is a good idea.

Only downside: The Dead Sea is about beauty treatments and rubbing mud all over your body (your skin will thank you).

So, there was a moment I wished, I had not been alone and someone had helped me with putting mud on my back since that can get tricky. But other than that: another fun solo activity.

Petra

Petra is an amazing place to go by yourself. It is the main tourist attraction and so people from all over the world flock here. This makes it easy to meet people and I met solo travelers with whom to talk to, and I also had chats with the Bedouins, so I never felt alone.Treasury view from aboveI actually wish I had had time by myself because you can enjoy this magical place even better when you are alone.

Road-tripping

I am an experienced driver but am a chicken sometimes – but driving in Jordan is quite easy and safe. The streets are often in a good condition and there are not many cars around which makes driving in Jordan quite stress-free (except for Amman). Jordan Road TripAnd if you are alone in Jordan, you can also road trip by yourself. It is easy, safe, and secure, so you do not have to worry or have somebody by your side to explore the beauty of the country.

Jerash

Jerash is an easy day trip (or half a day trip from Amman).  You can go to Jerash by yourself – whether you use public transportation or drive yourself. Using public transportation alone is not scary at all – the buses are small and you pay the driver once you get onto the bus.

While public transportation in Lebanon is crazy, it was quite stress-free here – just hop on a bus at the Northern Station and enjoy a cheap ride to Jerash. However, it is also possible to drive there by car.

 I met a Polish girl there and we shared a taxi ride back to Amman. So, there might be other solo travelers out there.

Dana Nature Reserve

Dana Nature Reserve is another great place to go to when traveling Jordan solo – you should stay overnight and once at the camp ask about hiking tours. Most camps offer hiking tours (ask via email in advance if you are unsure the camp offers some) and you will meet other travelers from around the world.

I met 2 more Dutch girls (apparently, Jordan is full of female Dutch travelers) and we did a guided walking hike with around 7-8 people.

This is something I would not recommend doing by yourself because (at least on the hike I did) the signage is not very good and it was not clear where we were headed. So, unless you have a good sense of direction or have a compass, I would advise taking a guided tour. 

Wadi Mujib

Wadi Mujib is a must- I am by no means overly sporty or adventurous, but that 3-hour trip was fun and one of the best things I did in Jordan. Wadi Mujib in Jordan is one of the fun places to go in Jordan

I did not really do it by myself though as I am not the sportiest person out there. And so I have to admit, that I would have sucked in doing the Wadi Mujib hike by myself. 

I hired a private hike and he helped me with the hike – helped me paddling, floating, climbing through the Wadi Mujib Gorge.

However, I saw other solo travelers doing the hikes by themselves so it might be a fun thing to do alone. Check out opening hours though as it is closed in the winter months.

These are my tips for solo female travelers in Jordan. Just follow these and you should have a fun, safe, and amazing experience in Jordan.

Check out my more detailed 7-day Jordan itinerary.Safe Travels, Arzo

Pin It on Pinterest